Commercial new construction

Commercial building architecture

By being a leader in energy management, we can assist with resources, technical assistance to building owners, developers and the design industry to create high-performance, and energy-efficient buildings.

Featured projects

A look at how owners, developers, and design teams of new commercial buildings have benefited from participating in the New Construction Program.

Whole building design

Thanks to strong interest from the development community in B.C. our program is currently fully subscribed.

When in market we offer design support for large buildings in the early stage of the design process that have potential electricity savings with at least 50,000 kWh per year.

For those looking to construct a new Part 3 commercial building see the CleanBC Commercial New Construction Program. The program provides funding for the design and construction of new high-performance buildings that use high-efficiency electricity in place of fossil fuels, in order to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

CleanBC logo

 

Energy-efficient lighting system design offer

The energy-efficient lighting system design offer is no longer available. As part of the whole building design offer, please reference the lighting calculator and reference guide.

Resources

Note: Effective May 1, 2015 all Whole Building Design project applications must comply with the updated program/modelling requirements referenced below.

Building envelope thermal bridging guide

This guide explores how the building industry in B.C. can meet the challenges of reducing energy use in buildings, in part by effectively accounting for the impact of thermal bridging.

Version 1.3 – December 2019

BETB Version 1.3 is the first of four major expansions of the BETB catalog and part of a larger project to transform the BETB Guide into a Canada-wide resource.

This project will develop an easy-to-use, web-based database to support industry fully recognizing the impact of thermal bridging in energy codes and in practice. When completed, the expanded BETB database and web-application called thermal.ly will be applicable to all Canadian climates, current construction practice and energy codes and construction types. The database will also include details and systems that are needed to meet future requirements for net-zero buildings.

This version adds 99 new details and 363 new scenarios that include generic and proprietary details and assemblies. A summary of the additional details follows. Many new assemblies have been added to this the database including window-wall, curtain wall, steel-framed, precast-concrete, wood-framed, mass timber, steel balconies, and roofing systems.

Details have been added for mitigating thermal bridges at interface details including the window to wall, roof to wall, concrete balconies, roof anchors, brick veneer shelf angles, intermediate floors, and at-grade interfaces.

Additional insulation scenarios have been added to walls and roofs from previous versions of the BETB guide to provide solutions for all of Canada's climates zones and net-zero buildings. Examples of new assemblies for net-zero buildings include highly insulated precast concrete sandwich panels, double framed wood-framed walls, highly insulated steel-framed walls, and increased mitigation of thermal bridging at concrete and steel balconies.

Refer to the original version of the BETB Guide released in 2014 for sections related to energy savings and cost benefit analysis (Part 2) and market transformation (Part 3: Significance, Insights, and Next Steps). These documents are still relevant to current realities, but are not materials that need to be referenced in everyday practice and have not been updated since the original version of the BETB Guide.

Version 1.2 – September 2018

The BETB Guide V 1.2 expands the thermal performance catalogue (Appendix A and B) with additional data for a number of newly analyzed assemblies and details. This includes more cladding attachment systems, window interfaces, precast concrete interfaces, wood frame and brick veneer walls and other thermal mitigation systems. This version also has updates to some previous values. All new data sheets have been added in sequentially so all detail reference numbers from V1.1 are still valid.

Refer to the original version of the BETB Guide released in 2014 for sections related to energy savings and cost benefit analysis (Part 2) and market transformation (Part 3: Significance, Insights, and Next Steps). These documents are still relevant to current realities but are not materials that need to be referenced in everyday practice and have not been updated since the original version of the BETB Guide.

Version 1.1 – April 2016

Many details and assemblies were added to the thermal performance catalogue (Appendix A and B) of BETB Guide Version 1.1. The sections related to the cost benefit analysis and market transformation have been removed so that the new version focuses only on providing thermal performance data and how to utilize this information in everyday practice.

Refer to the original version of the BETB Guide released in 2014 for sections related to energy savings and cost benefit analysis (Part 2) and market transformation (Part 3: Significance, Insights, and Next Steps). These documents are still relevant to current realities but are not material that need to be referenced in everyday practice and have not been updated since the original version of the BETB Guide.

Version 1.0 – October 2014

Most practitioners will find Part 1 and Appendices A and B to be most useful. Part 1 outlines how to effectively account for thermal bridging. Appendices A and B provide a catalog of common building envelope assemblies and interface details, and their associated thermal performance data.

Researchers and regulators will be interested in Part 2 and Part 3, and Appendices C to E. They contain the cost-benefit analysis, and discussion on significance and further insights, of using this guide to mitigate thermal bridging in buildings.