News release

BC Hydro completes construction of Interior to Lower Mainland transmission line

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New line to deliver reliable power to B.C.'s major population centres

VANCOUVER – BC Hydro has finished building the new, high-voltage, Interior to Lower Mainland transmission line. The 247 kilometre long, 500-kilovolt power line stretches from Merritt to Coquitlam. It’s an addition to BC Hydro’s system of transmission lines that will help bring power from where it is generated, on the Peace and Columbia rivers, to more than 3.2 million people on the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island.

"There haven't been any major upgrades to our bulk transmission system in more than 30 years and this new line is a vital link for the future," said Bill Bennett, Minister of Energy and Mines. "Demand for power continues to grow and BC Hydro needs to be able to meet that demand and transport electricity safely and efficiently from the places like Mica generating station and the WAC Bennett dam, to major load centres. This is just one example of the types of investment BC Hydro is making in the system through its capital plan."

"This line is a significant addition to our system and is one of many large projects and upgrades that are reaching completion," said Jessica McDonald, President and CEO of BC Hydro. "We're making these investments in a prudent and efficient way. BC Hydro has completed more than 550 infrastructure projects between fiscal 2011 and fiscal 2015, and collectively, these projects were delivered more than $71 million under budget."

The new line was built through tough and diverse terrain in B.C.'s southern interior. The line crosses mountains, grasslands, major rivers and highways. BC Hydro awarded the construction contract for the line in 2011 to Flatiron Graham Joint Venture and construction began in the spring of 2012.

The initial in-service date for the line was October 2014. However the contractor faced scheduling pressures during construction and, based on feedback from the contractor, BC Hydro pushed the in-service date to late 2015. The final cost of the line is expected to be $743 million – about $18 million higher than BC Hydro's original budget of $725 million.

To help alleviate the scheduling pressures, BC Hydro's own crews built one of the most challenging sections of the line: a 19-kilometre stretch near Hope. Work on that section of the line was completed by BC Hydro crews in July.

BC Hydro is in the midst of its capital plan and must invest, on average, $2.4 billion a year, over the next 10 years in the system. There are hundreds of projects underway in various stages across the province.

In addition to the Interior to Lower Mainland transmission line, BC Hydro is reporting milestones for two other significant capital projects this year:

  • The GM Shrum turbine replacement project at the WAC Bennett Dam was completed more than $100 million under budget. It involved refurbishing five generating units at the province’s largest facility, which will allow them to generate more power.
  • The Mica 5 & 6 project will be completed later this year, within budget. BC Hydro is adding two new generating units at Mica. When the facility was built in the 1970s, it was built with four generating units and space for two more to be added in the future.

Facts: about the new line

  • A 500-kilovolt, 247 kilometre single circuit transmission line.
  • Runs from Nicola substation near Merritt to Meridian substation in Coquitlam.
  • Project includes new 500-kilovolt series capacitor station at Ruby Creek near Agassiz and line termination work at Nicola and Meridian substations.
  • Total number of new transmission structures: 642.

Facts: jobs and contracting

  • The design build contractor for the line is Flatiron Graham Joint Venture.
  • The project created more than 850 direct jobs over three and a half years of construction.
  • Many local First Nations and businesses benefited from the project. For example:
    • Seven Generations Environmental Services, a Mission-based company owned by six Stó:lō First Nation communities, provided environmental monitoring and restoration work;
    • Katzie Development Corporation, a First Nations company based out of Pitt Meadows, provided archaeological and heritage monitoring – their job was to ensure the work being performed did not impact any heritage sites;
    • Mission Contracting conducted clearing and access road maintenance work;
    • Azmeth Forest Consultants Ltd, based out of Nanaimo, provided forestry consulting services;
    • Seabird, Smamalet Siyam, Sts’ailes, (SSSJV), a Fraser Valley-based joint venture, provided clearing and access work; and
    • Chatter Creek Holdings Ltd, a Golden-based company, conducted clearing and access work on the project.

Media contact:
BC Hydro Media Relations
p. 604 928 6468