News

Battery recycling in B.C. gets big boost

Rob Klovance
bchydro.com

Household non-rechargeable batteries now have a much better place than a landfill to go to when they die.

Starting July 1, 2010, Call2Recycle will now recycle any household battery – including alkaline non-rechargeables – via collection at nearly 1,500 locations across B.C. And that should make a significant impact on the number of batteries that wind up in the province's landfills each year.

Until Call2Recycle, a private, non-profit organization, announced the household battery recycling program on June 8, B.C. consumers had only limited access to household non-rechargeable battery recycling. Mountain Equipment Co-op and Ikea will recycle the batteries they sell, and others such as Best Buy and Future Shop accepted household non-rechargeables, but with Call2Recycle, the number of collection sites has expanded greatly.

"Our voluntary battery collection program has been a resounding success within this province, and we are eager to see the public's response to diverting even more batteries and cell phones out of community landfills under the expanded initiative," said Carl Smith, president and CEO of Call2Recycle, in he company's news release announcing the recycling expansion.

Consumers can visit call2recycle.ca to find the nearest drop-off location in their own communities.

To learn more about where to recycle batteries in B.C., see bchydro.com's Unplug This Blog! post on battery recycling. It has been updated to included Call2Recycle's new, expanded collection of household batteries.

"British Columbia is leading the way in promoting environmental stewardship by launching the first government-mandated household battery program in North America," said John Yap, British Columbia's Minister of State for Climate Action in reaction to the Call2Recycle announcement. "We fully support Call2Recycle's efforts to recycle batteries and cell phones into new products and keep them out of our solid waste stream, which will help the environment and the economy."

Rob Klovance is managing editor of bchydro.com.